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Chef Rich Torrisi’s original NYC venture was located around the corner from his new incarnation in the Puck Building. He draws inspiration from Nolita and Little Italy. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group

Dining Out

Rich Torrisi Goes Glam

The New York chef’s glitzy Torrisi Bar & Restaurant is like the cocktail party you don’t want to leave.

Nobody can accuse the Major Food Group of understatement. 

Case in point: Torrisi Bar & Restaurant, the restaurant group’s glitziest opening since the pandemic forced us to all take an unwanted vacation from each other. Following the playbook for celebrity-fueled hotspots like Carbone and Dirty French, this 4,000-square-foot behemoth gives New Yorkers still hungry for connection the thrill of the crowd.

An ode to Manhattan exclusionism, the restaurant also happens to be chef Rich Torrisi’s love letter to the city that gave him his start.

“In the years leading up to this moment, I had a feeling that Torrisi Bar & Restaurant belonged near Mulberry Street, surrounded by the stories and traditions that inspire me and this concept,” Torrisi said. (The chef’s original Torrisi Italian Specialties, a more modest Nolita neighborhood joint that closed in 2015, was a few steps away from this new incarnation.)

The location for Torrisi 2.0, on the rear ground-floor of the Puck Building, was just right. “Now that we’re ready to welcome guests, I’m absolutely convinced that Torrisi could only exist in this space, on this corner,” the chef explained. “I look forward to cooking here for many years to come. This is home.” 

The drinks program is run by Nathan McCarley-O’Neill of London’s famed Claridge’s. Expect lots of spins on old favorites. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group
The drinks program is run by Nathan McCarley-O’Neill of London‘s famed Claridge’s. Look out for the creative spins on old favorites. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group
The interior features a startling mural by artist Julian Schnabel of a grotesque, distinctly unpuckish Puck. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group
The interior features a startling mural by artist Julian Schnabel of a grotesque, distinctly unpuckish Puck. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group

Torrisi, 44, who grew up in the Hudson Valley, has been cooking professionally since he was 13.  His career led him to criss-cross the Atlantic, train in Europe, and eventually become a star under the tutelage of chefs like Marcus Samuelsson of Aquavit and Andrew Carmellini at Café Boulud. 

It’s not easy to get a reservation for the dining room, but the bar area is first-come, first-serve. Along with its tables and high-tops, you can order food and drinks at the two standing communal bars, all overlooked by the company’s first open kitchen. Here you’ll find hipsters in hoodies chatting with Euros draped in custom couture. It feels like a cocktail party you don’t want to leave. 

The drinks program, run by Nathan McCarley-O’Neill of London’s famed Claridge’s (don’t call him “master mixologist”—“bartender” is just fine) offers a slight spin on favorites, like the rhubarb and peach-scented Spritz Torrisi, an entire cocktail Negroni category, and an Old Fashioned elevated with almond-oil grappa. The diverse wine list spans the globe.

Chef Rich Torrisi’s original NYC venture was located around the corner from his new incarnation in the Puck Building. He draws inspiration from the neighborhood. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group
Chef Rich Torrisi’s original NYC venture was located around the corner from his new incarnation in the Puck Building. He draws inspiration from Nolita and Little Italy. Photo courtesy of Major Food Group

The menu—a composite of Italian and New York influences—has its surprises, and it’s playful but not poncy. Though the cavatelli with Jamaican beef ragù may seem more of a show stopper, our party was wowed by the chopped liver with Manischewitz on silverplate, smooth with a touch of sweetness, served with toast triangles, chopped herbs, and minced onions.

Even the simple tortellini pomodoro, which in less-experienced hands can look and taste like junior-high cafeteria food, was delicious here, filled with a classic mix of cheeses and smothered in bright tomatoes.  (Torrissi had considered taking it off the menu—perhaps because it was too basic? There was a foodie outcry. The tortellini stayed.)

The space, designed by NYC-based Garrett Singer Architecture + Design, somehow feels intimate, even given the cavernous space and soaring ceilings. A modern take on classic Little Italy, it’s anchored by a marble mosaic floor and a startling mural by neo-expressionist icon Julian Schnabel depicting a grotesque, distinctly unpuckish Puck. (Schnabel’s son Vito is an investor in many of MFG’s projects and helped the managing partners curate the art in the original Carbone.) Other standout design aspects include crushed-velvet banquettes the color of seafoam green and an emerald-quartzite marble bar with brass pendants.

For private parties, there’s a dining room that seats 18. One thing the Torrisi Bar & Restaurant is proving, in all its scenester, Instagram-worthy splendor: post-pandemic, #NYTough is again becoming #NYGrand.

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